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How to Make Money in Stocks

June 27, 2017 - Comment

How to Make Money in StocksRate this post Written by a man with superb credentials in the marketplace (O’Neil runs his own investment advisory service and heads up The Wall Street Journal), this brilliant book is an excellent investment guide that applies worldwide.From the school of unemotional investing comes the classic How to Make Money

How to Make Money in Stocks
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Written by a man with superb credentials in the marketplace (O’Neil runs his own investment advisory service and heads up The Wall Street Journal), this brilliant book is an excellent investment guide that applies worldwide.From the school of unemotional investing comes the classic How to Make Money in Stocks, by Wall Street analyst and publisher William O’Neil. Readers new to securities will find it an excellent primer, one that relies on time-honored indicators such as quarterly earnings, market capitalization, and daily indexes. O’Neil’s study of winning stocks stretches back to the 1960s, and he shares his insights here, describing what characterizes a growth stock, when to cut your losses (at 7 or 8 percent, no more), and how to spot a market top.

The techniques in How to Make Money in Stocks are hardly revolutionary, but therein lies their strength, as O’Neil claims his is “a winning system in good times or bad.” Investors interested in Net stocks might be disappointed–the author’s first rule is that a company must show a pattern of growing profits, which disqualifies many dot coms. (Try Rule Breakers, Rule Makers for a different take.) O’Neil’s approach to stocks is, above all, rational, and he pays little heed to market hype.

Those new to investing would do well to read this book before embarking, and even more seasoned traders may find How to Make Money in Stocks a refreshing return to basics. Markets may swing bull and bear, but O’Neil promises to stand firm. –Demian McLean

Comments

EroticOnion23 says:

It pretty much only talked about how to use the ‘ratings’ … This book is worth its weight in Benjamins, though one very crucial negative thing…O’Neal peddles his IBD at one of the most important (even he called it) sections. The EPS or earnings per share. It pretty much only talked about how to use the ‘ratings’ for EPS on his IBD. Unfortunately, you’ll have to learn about EPS in another book or somewhere else…Other than that, the best book for longs (and to an extend shorts) you can buy!

Amazon Customer suprised says:

This book is worth every penny it costs The past year I have been on a quest to really learn what it takes to successfully invest in the stock market. In 1987 I bought some stock at the urging of a so called “Hot Stock Broker”. The market crashed in October and I spent the next 15 years paying for my losses in the stock market. This experience defeated me so much that I swore I would never ever invest in the market again. To make a long story short, I met my second wife in 2006 and she was heavily invested in the stock market. I…

gunning says:

This may be the best book ever written in selecting This may be the best book ever written in selecting, buying, and selling stocks. As we all know, market direction is 70% of the money game. Oneil system of determining market direction has some flaws: they missed most of buy-dip chances during 2009-until now. Also IBD claims its IBD 50 has far better performance than index: did they account for whipsaws caused by 3 market statuses or simply compare IBD 50 with indexes in some years without re-positioning? Which benchmark is more appropriate to…

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